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Poor, minority adults with chronic kidney disease face increase risk of developing ESRD

October 22, 2017

"Minorities in the United States are two to four times more likely than non-minorities to progress to ESRD," said Andy I. Choi, M.D., M.A.S., study co-author and assistant professor, Division of Nephrology, University of California, San Francisco. "That represents a significant disparity that warrants greater study about the causes, consequences and preventive measures appropriate for people in this demographic."Because so little is known about CKD in the healthcare safety net, the authors call for additional research to assess what is needed to curb the progression of the disease, particularly among vulnerable populations. "More targeted research in these public healthcare and safety net settings is necessary to identify ways to slow the progression of the disease among the urban poor with CKD, thereby reducing disability and improving overall survival," said Yoshio N. Hall, M.D., study co-author and assistant professor of medicine, Kidney Research Institute, Division of Nephrology, University of Washington.

"Kidney disease is a growing problem in the United States, doubling in incidence over the last two decades. It's serious, and without proper diagnosis and treatment, kidney disease can lead to expensive treatments like transplantation or dialysis," said Sharon Anderson, M.D., FASN, president of the American Society of Nephrology. "Health care providers need to be especially vigilant screening patients who are most at-risk for developing kidney disease - minorities, seniors and those who have been diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease."

Source: American Society of Nephrology