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Medivir reports positive results from ASPIRE TMC435 phase 2b study for genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C

March 08, 2017

Overall, more than 40 percent of the cancer survivors reported experiencing some type of GI complication within 20 years after treatment. Additionally, the study indicated that patients who were diagnosed at an older age and who had undergone more intensive therapy, including radiation, chemotherapy and surgery, were more likely to develop long-term GI problems.

The researchers also compared the prevalence of GI disorders in the cancer survivors to a randomly selected group of the patients' siblings and found that the survivors had a significantly higher risk of developing upper GI complications such as ulcers, esophageal disease, and indigestion; lower GI issues such as intestinal polyps, chronic diarrhea and colitis; and liver conditions such as cirrhosis, gallstones, and jaundice.

"While physicians continue to learn about the long-term consequences of pediatric cancer and its therapy, it is essential that we provide comprehensive follow-up care that appropriately addresses the complications cancer survivors may experience," Goldsby said. "These are serious issues that can have a real impact on a person's quality of life."

Goldsby added that because the risks of late GI complications may change as therapy for childhood and adolescent cancer continues to evolve, studies of more recently treated patients will be needed.

Source: University of California - San Francisco